Great Combination for Cloud Storage: Ubuntu 12.04 + OpenStack Swift Essex Release

We are very excited to see the release of Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and OpenStack Essex, especially the Essex version of OpenStack Swift, and the brand-new Dashboard. We have not yet seen any performance review on the OpenStack Swift Essex running on Ubuntu 12.o4. The official Dashboard Demo introduced the components of System Panel and Mange Compute, without any details for the Object Store. So, we did an apple-to-apple cloud backup performance comparison between OpenStack Swift Essex on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and  OpenStack Swift 1.46 + Ubuntu 11.10, as well as demonstrated the functionality of Object Store in the OpenStack Dashboard.

In the following, we will first report our results on some select hardware configurations of proxy and storage node on EC2. Our previous blog (Next steps with the OpenStack Advisor) provides details about these hardware configurations and we use the following four configurations as the example implementations of a “small-scale” Swift cloud.

  • 1 Large Instance based proxy node: 5 Small Instance based storage nodes
  • 1 XL Instance based proxy node: 5 Small Instance based storage nodes
  • 1 CPU XL Instance based proxy node: 5 Small Instance based storage nodes
  • 1 Quad Instance based proxy node: 5 Medium Instance based storage nodes

The Large, XL, CPU XL and Quad instances cover a wide range of CPU and memory selections. For network I/O, Large, XL and CPU XL instances are provisioned with a Gigabit Ethernet (100~120MB/s), while the Quad instance offers 10 Gigabit Ethernet (~1.20GB/s) connectivity.

Again, we use Amanda Enterprise as our application to backup and recover a 10GB data file to/from the Swift cloud to test its write and read throughput respectively. We ensure that one Amanda Enterprise server can fully load the Swift cloud in all cases.

Two systems involved in the comparison are: (1) Ubuntu 11.10 + OpenStack Swift 1.4.6; (2) Ubuntu 12.04 LTS + OpenStack Swift Essex (Configuration parameters of OS, OpenStack and Amanda Enterprise are identical).  In the following, we use 11.10+1.46 and 12.04+Essex as the labels to represent the above two systems.

(1) Proxy node runs on the Large instance and 5 storage nodes run on the Small instances. (Note that the throughput values on y-axis are not plotted from zero)

(2) Proxy node runs on the XL instance and 5 storage nodes run on the Small instances.

(3) Proxy node runs on the CPU XL instance and 5 storage nodes run on the Small instances.

(4) Proxy node runs on the Quad instance and 5 storage nodes run on the Medium instances.

From the above comparisons, we found out 12.04 + Essex performs better than 11.10+1.4.6 in terms of the backup throughput, and the performance gap ranges from 2% - 20% with the average of 9.7%.  For recovery throughput, the average speedup over 11.10+1.4.6 is not as significant as the backup throughput.

We did not dig into as to who (Ubuntu 12.04 LTS or OpenStack Essex) is the cause of this slight improvement on throughput. But we can see that the overall combination performs statistically better. From our initial testing, based on the performance improvements as well as feature improvements, we encourage anyone who is running OpenStack Swift on Ubuntu to upgrade to the latest released versions to take advantages of their new updates. Five years support for 12.04 LTS is a great assurance to maximize ROI for your cloud storage implementation.

Next, we demonstrate the functionality of Object Store within the OpenStack Dashboard.

After we log into the Dashboard and click the “Project” Tab on the left and then the “Containers” under the “Object Store”, we see screen as below:

We can create a container by clicking “Create Container” button and we see the following screen:

After creating a container, we can click the container name and browse the objects associated with that container. Initially, a newly-created container is empty.

We can upload an object to the container by clicking “Upload Object” button:

Meanwhile, we can delete an object from the container by choosing the “Delete Object” from its corresponding drop-down list at the “Actions” column.

Also, we can choose to delete a container by  choosing the “Delete Container” from its corresponding drop-down list at the “Actions” column.

Here, we demonstrate the core functionality of Object Store in OpenStack Dashboard and from the above screenshots, we can observe that Dashboard provides very neat and friendly user interfaces to mange the containers and objects. This saves lot of time to look up command-line syntax for basic functionality.

Congratulations, Ubuntu and OpenStack teams!  The Ubuntu 12.04 + OpenStack Swift Essex Release combination is a great contribution to Open Source and Cloud Storage communities!

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